Clear Mind Research

Neurofeedback

Study: Neurofeedback treatment for ADHD in only 12 sessions?

By: Dr. David Rabiner Neu­ro­feed­back — also known as EEG Biofeed­back — is treat­ment for ADHD in which indi­vid­u­als learn to pro­duce and main­tain a pat­tern of EEG activ­ity that is con­sis­tent with a focused, atten­tive state. This is done by col­lect­ing EEG data from indi­vid­u­als as they focus on stim­uli pre­sented on a com­puter screen. Their abil­ity to con­trol the stim­uli, for exam­ple, keep­ing the smile on a smi­ley face or keep­ing a video play­ing, is con­tin­gent on main­tain­ing an EEG state con­sis­tent with focused atten­tion. Over­time, indi­vid­u­als learn to do this dur­ing the train­ing; neu­ro­feed­back pro­po­nents argue that this gen­er­al­izes to real world sit­u­a­tions and results in bet­ter atten­tion dur­ing aca­d­e­mic and related tasks. I have reviewed mul­ti­ple neu­ro­feed­back stud­ies in prior issues of Atten­tion Research Update and recently reviewed 2 stud­ies that yielded excep­tion­ally pos­i­tive find­ings. Results from these sug­gested that neu­ro­feed­back may yield com­pa­ra­ble ben­e­fits for ...
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Hook-up of Neurofeedback Sensors

Therapists are using neurofeedback to treat ADHD, PTSD and other conditions

By Arlene Karidis In September 2013, Chris Gardner went from kicking and spinning as a black belt in taekwondo to being locked in a world where he could not follow conversations — or even walk his dog. The 58-year-old Vienna, Va., resident had just had brain surgery to remove a large tumor, and the operation affected his mobility and cognition. After nine months of physical and occupational therapy, he’d made little progress. So he tried neurofeedback, hoping this controversial treatment would improve his balance and mental processes. Neurofeedback — a type of biofeedback — uses movies, video games, computers and other tools to help individuals regulate their brain waves. A patient might watch a movie, for example, while hooked to sensors that send data to a computer. A therapist, following the brain activity on a monitor, programs the computer to stop the movie if an abnormal number of fast or ...
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Neurofeedback

Perspective: Neurofeedback treatment for ADHD is gaining strong support

By: Dr. David Rabiner Neu­ro­feed­back — also known as EEG Biofeed­back — is an ADHD treat­ment in which indi­vid­u­als learn to alter their typ­i­cal EEG pat­tern to one that is con­sis­tent with a focused, atten­tive state. This is done by col­lect­ing EEG data from indi­vid­u­als as they focus on stim­uli pre­sented on a com­puter screen. Their abil­ity to con­trol the stim­uli, for exam­ple, keep­ing the smile on a smi­ley face or keep­ing a video play­ing, is con­tin­gent on main­tain­ing an EEG state con­sis­tent with focused atten­tion. Neu­ro­feed­back pro­po­nents argue that this abil­ity gen­er­al­izes to real world sit­u­a­tions and results in bet­ter atten­tion dur­ing aca­d­e­mic and related tasks. Click here to read the entire article ...
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New Study Supports Neurofeedback Treatment for ADHD

By: Dr. David Rabiner Neurofeedback — also known as EEG Biofeed­back — is an approach for treating ADHD in which individuals are provided realtime feed­back on their brainwave patterns and taught to alter their typical EEG pattern to one that is consistent with a focused, attentive state. This is typically done by collecting EEG data from individuals as they focus on stimuli presented on a computer screen. Their ability to control the stimuli, for example, keeping the smile on a smiley face, is contingent on maintaining the particular EEG state being trained. According to neurofeedback proponents, learning how to do this during training generalizes to real world situations and this results in improved attention and reduced hyperactive/impulsive behavior. Click here to read the entire article ...
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